CFP: Critical Arts: Under Fire articles

Temporary free access and Call

Critical Arts is placing on temporary free access on a rolling basis all the Under Fire articles that have been published to date. These are short essays that uncompromisingly address pressing issues facing academia, our students and our societies, but which are rarely discussed in the formal academic literature. This first batch is available on free access until 29 February.

Under fire

CFP: The 16th Annual Global Communication Association Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS

Perspectives on Africa Media and Communication

Durban, South Africa

June 10-12, 2020

Hosted by the Durban University of Technology and supported by the University of Kwazulu-Natal, Mangosuthu University of Technology, and University of Zululand, the Global Communication Association invites you to submit your abstracts for the 16th annual convention to be held in Durban, South Africa from June 10 – 12, 2020.

The GCA invites research papers exploring any aspect of issues related to the theme of the conference, including the following broad topics:

  • African media and communication methodologies, theories, and perspectives
  • Media and their impact on public opinion
  • The evolving modes of teaching and learning
  • New communication technologies, the Internet, and social media
  • Intercultural communication
  • News and information flow



    Abstract Submission: (All submissions should include two separate attachments in Word format)
  • A 400-word abstract of the paper or panel proposal should be submitted electronically to Dr. S.E Usadolo and Mr Thabani Khumalo via the following email: gcaconference@dut.ac.za
  • All abstract submissions must be received by February 29, 2020, for review and consideration. Acceptance of a paper or panel proposal obligates authors to attend the conference and present the paper.  The abstract should include research objectives, methodology and significance followed by keywords.
  • Poster presentations on topics related to the conference theme are also encouraged. Complete panel proposals may be submitted to Dr. Yahya R. Kamalipour at yrkamal@gmail.com.
  • Abstracts will be peer-reviewed by at least two scholars.  Authors of the abstracts will be notified of acceptance by March 15, 2020.  
  • A separate document including the name, academic institution, mailing address, phone number, email address, and brief author’s profile must be submitted for each author.
  • If accepted, the full-length paper (not to exceed 25-pages excluding references and tables) must be submitted by May 30, 2020.  All papers should adhere to The American Psychological Association (APA) style manual. For details, visithttps://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/05.
  • Where appropriate, put “STUDENT” in the upper right-hand corner of the title page; indicate whether the paper comes from a bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral student.

CONFERENCE LOCATION (HOTEL AND FACILITIES):

The conference will take place on the campus of the Durban University of Technology (DUT).

Special Conference rates will be offered by several hotels in Durban, within a 5km radius of the conference venue.

Details of these rates and the hotel links will be provided shortly.  Delegates are requested to register as early as possible, as Durban is a popular tourist destination during this time.

Accommodation Link:  https://www.dut.ac.za/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/Accommodation-Durban-KwaZulu-Natal-South-Africa-2020.pdf

Conference Registration Fees:

  • Standard registrations – early bird: R2500.00 – Register before 20 February 2020 -Provide proof of payment before 21 February 2020.
  • Standard registrations- normal: R3500.00- Register before 01 May 2020.
  • Postgraduate students- early bird: R1500.00 – Register before 20 February 2020 – Provide proof of payment before 21 February 2020.
  • Postgraduate students- normal: R2500.00- Register before 01 May 2020.
  • An attractive and favorable package will be offered to all participants.  Graduate students presenting papers will be given a 50% registration discount. A registration link and details of fees and payment procedures are attached below: 

    Registration Link: https://www.dut.ac.za/gca-2020/

                                      

AIR TRANSPORT: There are daily flights from major cities around the world to South Africa. Some international airlines fly directly to Durban, while others fly to Cape Town or Johannesburg, domestic airlines can be used to fly to Durban. Emirates and British Airways, Qatar Turkish Airlines fly directly to Durban. For details visit https://kingshakainternational.co.za/airport/durban-airport/

GROUND TRANSPORT: Delegates will be met on arrival at King Shaka International Airport in Durban and transported to their hotels or to the conference venue, depending on the date of arrival. Shuttles will be provided from the hotels to the conference and event venues.

After the conference, shuttles will be provided from the hotels to the airport. Links to approved tour agents will be provided if delegates wish to tour after or before the conference. Meter taxis and Uber are also available and distance from King Shaka International Airport to Durban City is 30 km.

OPTIONAL TOURS: After the conference, interested participants may take advantage of an optional tour such as visiting a safari.

Questions:

Please direct any questions to Dr. Yahya R. Kamalipour at yrkamal@gmail.com.

Important Dates:

Abstract Submission Deadline February 29, 2020
Acceptance Notification March 15, 2020
Last Date for Early Bird Registration April 15, 2020
Last Date for Registration May 15, 2020
Full Length Paper Submission May 30, 2020
Conference Dates June 10-12, 2020
Optional Tours June 13, 2020

CFP: CALL FOR PROPOSALS

The 2020 CILECT Congress at Westerdals Institute for Film and Media, Kristiania University College,

Oslo, Norway (4-9 October 2020) will incorporate a conference under the title

AUDIOVISUAL EDUCATION: IMPACT AND RELEVANCE

The global streaming platforms are disrupting traditional film and television linear storytelling and distribution models. The competition to make an impact is stronger than ever. But impact has both positive and negative connotations. Images could produce new ideas, but could also reinforce cultural stereotypes. Stories could reveal areas of human co-existence, but could also reproduce dominant ideologies.

Relevance in this context relate audio-visual education to societal change.

In putting the focus on impact and relevance in this conference, the aim is to emphasise the multiple spheres of influence that images and stories have. Access to technologies and the changes in audiences’ adoption and adaption to the new platforms requires a re-examination of education.

We encourage submissions that would address questions such as:

What shapes the audio-visual curriculum in the time of transformation of the technological means and the distribution platforms?

What are the new storytelling models in the age of serial and multilinear drama?

How can we bridge?

We expect:

Theoretical Presentations & Case Studies (up to 30 mins.)

Workshops (up to 60 mins.)

Exhibitions & Screenings All proposals must include:

An abstract (up to 200 words) that describes the content and form of the presentation or activity

A short bio of the proposer up to 100 words

A photograph of the proposer that is at least 1 MB and no more than 5 MB in size

Please send all submissions by email to executive.director@cilect.org
NOT LATER THAN 15 MARCH 2020

https://www.cilect.org/

CFP: Film in history / History in film Conference

                       

2-4 April 2020

The South African film industry has a long history, albeit racially fractured, uneven and inconsistent.  Since the introduction of Edison’s kinetoscope in 1895, the film industry and a film culture has become deeply entrenched in South African cultural, political and social life.  The historical development of the South African film industry, and in particular pre- and post-1994 state intervention by means of funding mechanisms, offers a rich site of exploration of South African racial and cultural politics, as well as ideological, aspirational and idealised self-representations in film.  Cinema as both a text and a set of practices and activities which are constantly intervening in society, makes cinema an actor in the ‘maintenance, mutation and subversion of systems of power’. Within this framing, film is read and analysed in history and as source of history; in shaping and reflecting the context of production and reception, in short, as ‘agent, product and source of history’, according to Marc Ferro.

History is increasingly consumed on film. Indeed, Marc Ferro goes further than many scholars in emphasising the ubiquitous influence of visual representations of the past.  He says, ‘television (and one can include film here) has become a kind of parallel school’, in other words, film as history.  Paula Amad (2010) on the other hand, in arguing for film as counter-archive, positions film as a medium that poses a challenge to the positivist historical methodology and archive with its emphasis on order, scientific objectivity and neutrality as elaborated by Leopold von Ranke.

The conference seeks to engage with film in South Africa in the four domains discussed above; film in history, film as source of history, film as history and film as counter-archive.  The conference aims to bring together South African and international scholars working broadly in the domain of film and history in and about South Africa.  The conference is open to all scholars whose research interest is film and visual studies from a historical perspective, including research interests in the historical development of cinema (in the South African national, comparative and/or global contexts), cinema culture, audiences, festivals and reception, technologies and the business of filmmaking as well as historians working with film as history, film in history and film as [counter]archive.

Select conference papers will be considered for publication in an edited volume

Abstracts for presentations are invited in the following broad thematic areas:

  1. Histories of the development of the South African film industry (‘national’, ‘ethnic’ and comparative)
  2. Film and nation-building in pre- and post-1994 South Africa
  3. State intervention in the film industry in pre- and post-1994 South Africa (state subsidies, the NFVF, censorship)
  4. Audiences and reception
  5. Film festivals
  6. South African film scholarship
  7. Archives, counter-archives and film (the South African National Film, Video and Sound Archives)
  8. Film, heritage and tourism

Film Screenings

The conference will include film screenings of select films from the South African National Film, Video and Sound Archives and short films produced by University of Pretoria History students.  Filmmakers are also invited to submit their own productions for consideration.

Publication

A select number of original research papers will be considered for publication in an edited volume of essays.

Timelines

Abstract deadline:  20 January 2020

Abstracts can be submitted to history@up.ac.za

Acceptance responses: 7 February 2020

Publication-ready papers to be submitted by 17 April 2020

Inquiries can be directed to:

Ian Macqueen: ian.macqueen@up.ac.za

Glen Ncube: glen.ncube@up.ac.za

Nisa Paleker: nisa.paleker@up.ac.za

Dr G Paleker

Senior Lecturer

Department of Historical and Heritage Studies

Tel: 012 420 2264

Email: nisa.paleker@up.ac.za

CFP: Black Panther

Beschara Karam (University of South Africa); Mark Kirby-Hirst (Open Window) and Rory du Plessis (University of Pretoria)

In light of the hugely successful, and critically acclaimed, film release of the film Black Panther (Coogler 2018); as well as the debates surrounding the film, this Call for Chapters is dedicating a book to this very pertinent film. The film focuses on the themes Afrofuturism; of identity; dehumanisation; feminism; alienation; and reclamation. It also allows for the exploration of other themes integral to the experience of Africa and the Diaspora, including (but not limited to) slavery; apartheid; othering; marginalisation; history; colonisation; post-colonisation; memory; trauma; and, decolonisation (see Karam and Kirby-Hirst 2019).

We are therefore looking for original contributions from researchers working on any aspect of Black Panther; including the comic books and graphic novels upon which the film is based. Please send an extended abstract (of between 300 – 500 words maximum, excluding sources) outlining your chapter to reach us no later than 17th December 2019: bpafricadiaspora@gmail.com For more information, please contact: Professor Beschara Karam 012 429 6323 karambs@unisa.ac.za / beschara karam@gmail.com

CALL FOR ABSTRACTS: Social Media, Fake News and Hate Speech

NORTH-WEST UNIVERSITY, SOUTH AFRICA
FACULTY OF HUMANITIES
INDIGENOUS LANGUAGE MEDIA IN AFRICA (ILMA) CONFERENCE
JUNE 27
28, 2020
NORTH-WEST UNIVERSITY, MAFIKENG CAMPUS, MMABATHO, SOUTH AFRICA


The advent of social media (such as Facebook, Twitter, WhatsApp, YouTube etc.) has brought about democratisation of communication as the public that hitherto had been considered to be consumers of messages has now also become producers. The platform of social media is open to everyone who has a device, an account to use and data or access to the internet. Communication has never been better and interesting in the history of man.

However, as we celebrate this ‘power’ of communication given to the people through social media, we also need to ponder the other side of this communication. This advent of social media and with it more opportunities for free participation by citizens in debates has given impetus to insurgent politics and also brought on us the acceleration and strengthening of post-truth, fake news and hate speeches. Before the emergence of social media, there were fake news and hate speech carried by different media in the chronology of media and communication history. These phenomena have been there since the time of communication by mere words of mouth, and through the advent of print, radio and television media. It has however become more obtrusive with the emergence of social media. This has had some deleterious impact on human relationships and the society at large. It has created crisis and fueled it to monstrous proportions.

These are some of the issues we intend to focus on in this conference. Submissions can touch on any of the following points:

  •  Theorisation around social media, fake news and hate speech
  •  Social media, Fake news, hate speech and the economy
  •  Social media, Fake news, hate speech and politics
  •  Social media, Fake news, hate speech and nationality
  •  Social media, Fake news, hate speech and race
  •  Social media, Fake news, hate speech and human relations
  •  Social media, fake news and hate speech in organisations
  •  Social media, fake news, hate speech and religion
  •  Social media, language use, fake news and hate speech
  •  Social media, indigenous language, ethnicity and hate speech
  • Social media, indigenous culture, fake news and hate speech
  •  Social media, citizen education, fake news and hate speech
  •  Social media, fake news, hate speech and xenophobia
  •  Strengths and weaknesses of various social media for fake news and hate speech
  •  Social media regulation, fake news and hate speech The list is by no means exhaustive.

Kindly submit abstracts of between 300 and 500 words to Dr. Francis Amenaghawon at

olaiyagba@yahoo.com

Papers presented at the conference, after peer-review process, will be published in Habari: ILMA Book Series. Habari is the Swahili word for News. The book series editors are Professor Abiodun Salawu and Prof. Itumeleng Mekoa.

Important Dates:

  1. Abstract Submission – February 28, 2020
  2. Acceptance/Rejection Notice – March 15, 2020
  3. Conference Registration Opens – March 30, 2020
  4. Conference – June 27 – 28, 2020

Registration Fees:

Academics – R2500.00
Students – R1000.00
International participants – USD180.00

CFP: Valenti Global Communication Summit 2020

Call for Papers

Valenti Global Communication Summit 2020

@frica: digital media conference

Houston, TX – February 27/28, 2020

Deadline for extended abstracts: November 22, 2019

While the economic, political, cultural and social transformations brought about by the rise of digital technologies, particularly in the media and telecommunications sectors, are visible all over the world, it is in African countries that they are projected to have the biggest impact in coming years. Africa, particularly Sub-Saharan Africa, has one of the fastest growing number of internet and mobile users in the world.

In many parts of the continent, access to information and communication technologies (ICTs) has been seen as an opportunity to “leapfrog”, a concept that the World Bank defines as making “a quick jump in economic development” by adopting technological innovation. This is exemplified by the success of African startups like Ushahidi, a crowdsourcing mapping tool created in Kenya, or Jumia, Nigeria’s number 1 online retailer; the recent opening of Google’s Africa AI center in Ghana; and the ever-growing presence of mobile payment and banking across the continent. Digital communication technologies have also been used strategically by citizens in the continent to engage in grassroots political movements that have toppled long-time rulers, led to (sometimes short-lived) regime changes, and brought about changes in legislation.

The fast growth of digitally enabled communications and services has also brought challenges for the continent. For example, well-before the notion of “fake news” became a buzzword in U.S. politics, many African nations, from South Africa to Gabon or Nigeria, were targets of large-scale misinformation campaigns over social media such as WhatsApp and Facebook. Additionally, young, highly-educated, and digitally-savvy graduates in many African countries have been employed by transnational tech companies such as Facebook for data processing in what some authors describe as digital sweatshops. The positive and negative impacts of this technological revolution are therefore important to consider.

Because African countries, their people, and their mediated interactions remain understudied in the fields of media and communication, especially in Western countries, the “@frica: digital media conference” invites extended abstracts (800-1,000 words) that examine the transformations and disruptions of digital media in African countries.

Specifically, but not exclusively, we invite contributions that explore any of the following questions:

  • What methodological challenges exist in studying digital media use (such as social media and/or mobile communications) in Africa?
  • What theoretical frameworks, constructs and paradigms are best suited to study transformations and disruptions of digital media in Africa?
  • How has social media been used by African political actors, social movements and grassroots activists and to what effect?
  • What are the roots, consequences and differences between countries of existing disparities in access to digital media in Africa?
  • How are digital technologies influencing, complementing, and/or superseding journalistic practices in Africa?
  • How does the sharing economy (e.g. Uber, Upwork…) transform and/or reinforce social norms, values, practices, structure and culture in Africa?
  • What are the prevailing regulatory frameworks that affect digital media use in Africa?
  • What socio-economic, cultural and economic factors shape the adoption, diffusion and appropriation of digital technologies in Africa?

The deadline to submit extended abstracts is November 22, 2019. To submit an extended abstract, please go to https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=admc20. You will need to create an account to make a submission.  

The organizers will notify by email the authors of accepted extended abstracts by December 6, 2019. Authors will be expected to submit full papers by February 2, 2020.

The “@frica: digital media conference” will accept a limited number of virtual presentations, in which authors who are unable to travel to Houston, will be able to present their work and get feedback from the audience virtually. Authors who wish to be considered for one of the virtual presentation slots should indicate their preference when submitting their extended abstracts.

A selection of accepted papers will be included in a Special Issue of the Journal of African Media Studies to be published in 2020. Only accepted papers that are presented at the conference will be considered for the Special Issue. Questions about the conference and the Call for Papers can be sent to valentiglobalsummit@uh.edu

CFP: Image & Text (edition #34): Visual rhetoric and rhetorics of the visual


Call for ARTICLES

Image & Text (ISSN: 1020 1497, accreditation 1997)is dedicating a special themed edition, aimed for publication in 2020, to articles that draw attention to rhetorical aspects of visual culture. These rhetorical facets may include the communicative strategies utilised towards making visual products persuasive but also the verbal rhetorical arguments that accompany the creation, promotion or evaluation of the visual.

While rhetoric is traditionally situated within the realms of political and legal argumentation, ‘rhetoric’ is to be found in any arena where communication goals are present. Insofar as a tremendous amount of communication takes place visually, the study of non-verbal and visual rhetoric is a growing area of enquiry. To consider the ‘rhetoric’ of a visual cultural product is to ask what makes the visual text engage or communicate effectively. Visual texts, as ‘rhetorical arguments’ draw our attention by persuading us of their relevance, they convince us of their quality through an ‘eloquence’ of form, and they project an ethos of credibility or authority by exploiting powerful visual conventions. To be rhetorically persuasive, then, can mean to stand out (to draw and maintain attention), but also to become ‘invisible’ (and therefore appear as natural or ‘objective’).

In addition to contributing to the growing area of research on visual rhetoric, this special edition seeks to re-emphasise the importance of rhetorical criticism towards understanding the discursive aspects of visual culture. Visual texts do not operate in isolation. The production and reception of the visual are highly influenced by discursive communities and practices. Verbal utterances of curators and critics, as well as the creators themselves, are thus powerful rhetorical products worthy of further examination. To consider ‘rhetorics of the visual’ is then to interrogate how and why the visual is spoken about in particular ways. In other words, a rhetorical perspective allows one to question the discourses of individuals or communities in terms of how these discourses are used in the description, justification, rationalisation and evaluation of visual practices.

We are therefore looking for original contributions from researchers working on any aspect of “visual rhetoric/rhetorics of the visual”. Contributors are invited to focus on issues/questions such as:

•        Visual rhetorical strategies or tactics as embodied in visual cultural, art and design products

•        Visual rhetoric of both image and text (as used separately or combined)

•        The application of theories of rhetoric towards interpreting the visual

•        The identification and analysis of rhetorical tropes or communicative conventions (as found in particular visual cultural contexts, genres, geographic locations or historical periods)

•        Comparative rhetorical analyses across contexts, genres, media, etc.

•        Rhetorical theory and interpretation towards socio-cultural critique  

•        Problematic or ethically questionable instances of rhetorical argumentation through / surrounding the visual

Please send an extended abstract (of between 300 – 500 words maximum, excluding sources) outlining your article idea by 30 September to the Guest Themed Issue Editor, Dr Anneli Bowie (annelibowie@gmail.com), providing the following information:

•        topic and outline of article

•        form the proposed article will take (e.g., exploratory, theoretical)

•        unique research contribution that article aims to make.

SUCCESSFUL ABSTRACTS:
Authors will be informed of the outcome of the selection process by 30 November 2019.

Authors of abstracts selected for inclusion will be invited to submit a full article of approximately 5 000 – 7 000 words in length (including references) by no later than 30 March 2020. All full article submissions must be formatted according to the Image & Text style guide, available at: http://www.imageandtext.up.ac.za/

Note: All full submissions will undergo a double-blind review and there is no guarantee of acceptance of the final article prior to the completion of the review process.

CFP: The Asian Conference on Education 2019

“Independence & Interdependence”
The conference theme for The Asian Conference on Education 2019 (ACE2019) is “Independence & Interdependence”, and invites reflections on the desirability, extent and limits on independence and autonomy for ourselves, our students, and the institutions and structures within which we work, teach and learn. We do not educate, nor are we educated, in vacuums, but in such contexts and constraints as families, groups, and societies; of nations and cultures; of identities and religions; and of political and financial realities.The technological and logistical advances of globalisation have enabled us to become independent and empowered as never before, but have also made us more dependent on the very things allowing autonomy. While technologies allow us to communicate with those on the other side of the world, they can also separate us from those nearby, and contribute to alienation, or loneliness. And yet this increased interconnectedness offers great opportunities to work together to solve some of the world’s most pressing issues, and reminds us of our responsibilities towards each other. Our independence is contextualised in the relations we enjoy with others; in our families and communities, shared institutions, in our wider societies, geographical and political entities, and finally, as a part of the one world we all share.How do we help students and teachers alike navigate and curate the vast information available? How do we encourage individual growth while also underlining the importance of belonging and of the reciprocal responsibilities and privileges of education? How do we help students build the skills and attitudes necessary for positive engagement in distributed, globalised communities that so often lead to polarisation and alienation instead? How do we educate with independence and interdependence in mind? How do we engage meaningfully in “international development” through education? What are the successes and failures of the international system in addressing some of the most pressing concerns of our time?These and many other questions will be addressed at the conference, and we look forward to coming together to exchange ideas and explore new research paths together. We encourage scholars and practitioners working at the intersection of education and international development to explore and submit under the following conference themes:Diversity in Global ContextsEducation & Socio-Economic DevelopmentEducation & Development: Local & Global/Domestic & InternationalEducation: Public & Private PartnershipsEconomics & Management of EducationLiteracy: Poverty & SustainabilityInnovation & ValueIn conjunction with our Global Partners, we look forward to extending you a warm welcome in 2019.

– The ACE2019 Organising CommitteeTien-Hui Chiang, Zhengzhou University, China
Joseph Haldane, The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan
Paul Lai, Nagoya University, Japan
Tzu-Bin Lin, National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan
Yvonne Masters, University of New England, Australia
José McClanahan, Creighton University, USA
Ted O’Neill, Gakushuin University, Japan
Justin Sanders, Osaka University, Japan
Zachary Walker, University College London (UCL), UK

Financial Support for PhD students and Early Career Academics

IAFOR is dedicated to helping young scholars achieve their research and academic goals, while also encouraging them to apply the principles of interdisciplinary study to their work. IAFOR offers travel and accommodation grants, and full or partial scholarships covering conference registration fees, to select PhD students and early career academics who might not otherwise have the financial resources to be able to attend our academic conferences.

For information about the financial support IAFOR offers to PhD students and early career academics, please visit our Grants & Scholarships page. If you know anyone who could benefit from IAFOR’s Grants & Scholarships Programme, please forward this URL: https://ace.iafor.org/grants-and-scholarships/. Abstracts must be submitted by June 21, 2019 in order to be considered for funding.

Location & Venue: Toshi Center Hotel, Tokyo, Japan
Conference Dates: Thursday, October 31, 2019 to Sunday, November 3, 2019
Conference Theme: Independence & Interdependence

Early Bird Abstract Submission Deadline: June 21, 2019*
Final Abstract Submission Deadline: August 22, 2019

Early Bird Registration Deadline: July 18, 2019*
Final Registration Deadline for presenters: September 19, 2019

This conference is organised by The International Academic Forum (IAFOR) in association with the IAFOR Research Centre at the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) in Osaka University, Japan.

Join the conversation with #IAFOR and #IAFORACE

*Submit early to take advantage of the discounted registration rates. 

CFP – SACOMM 2019: August 28-30, University of Cape Town

Inside | Outside

CALL FOR PAPERS

Current communication debates are increasingly dominated by polarities and conflicts. On closer inspection, these polarities are not always defined by antagonism or opposing ideologies, but are also informed by power imbalances in terms of race, class and gender, technological access, education, age, geospatial factors, and mobility.

This year’s theme looks at the positions of communications specialists, media producers and users as being inside or outside media systems; from being inside the echo chamber to being shut out by censorship; from speaking as an inside whistleblower to being left outside the frame. Who has and who controls access to creative technologies and distribution? Who speaks, who is being followed, who is being listened to and whose voices are being amplified? What is heard on air, or edited out? How does one’s position (either inside or outside) make one vulnerable, empowered, educated or misinformed?

Themes may include, but are not limited to the following:

Content platforms and gatekeepers

Film, media and marginality

Media networks and ecologies

Film and media censorship

Citizen journalism, community media and media corporations

Television beyond the box

Media scholarship and inclusion

African media scholarship in the world

Media platforms and questions of access

WhatsApp and citizen witnesses

News writing and news aggregation

Threats to media freedom

Social media

Corporate communication, crisis communication, strategic communication, organisational communication

Development communication

Election coverage

ABSTRACT CATEGORIES

There will be three categories of presentation:

Category 1: Full 20-minute conference paper presentations

Category 2: Panel discussion sessions and/or roundtable/workshop proposals

Category 3: Poster presentations

Best Paper Prizes

There are two paper prizes: a student award and an open paper prize. To be eligible for the awards, full papers must be submitted by 5th of August.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS

All abstracts must be submitted to the email address: sacomm2019@gmail.com, using the correct abstract submission form. Submissions not submitted on the correct form will not be accepted. Incomplete submissions will not be accepted. Submission of one abstract per person is encouraged to keep the programme manageable. No more than two abstracts per person (for different streams) will be allowed.

The Abstract Submission form can be downloaded here: Abstract Submission Form

Key dates:

Abstract: 30 April 2019

Notification of acceptance: 31 May 2019

Full paper submission: 5 August 2019

This year’s theme looks at the positions of media producers and users as being inside or outside media systems; from being inside the echo chamber to being shut out by censorship; from speaking as an inside whistleblower to being left outside the frame. Who has and who controls access to creative technologies and distribution? Who speaks, who is being followed, who is being listened to and whose voices are being amplified? What is heard on air, or edited out? How does one’s position (either inside or outside) make one vulnerable, empowered, educated or misinformed?

Themes may include, but are not limited to the following:

Content platforms and gatekeepers

Film, media and marginality

Media networks and ecologies

Film and media censorship

Citizen journalism, community media and media corporations

Television beyond the box

Media scholarship and inclusion

African media scholarship in the world

Media platforms and questions of access

WhatsApp and citizen witnesses

News writing and news aggregation

Threats to media freedom

Election coverage

ABSTRACT CATEGORIES

There will be three categories of presentation:

Category 1: Full 20-minute conference paper presentations

Category 2: Panel discussion sessions and/or roundtable/workshop proposals

Category 3: Poster presentations

Best Paper Prizes

There are two paper prizes: a student award and an open paper prize. To be eligible for the awards, full papers must be submitted by 5th of August.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS

All abstracts must be submitted to the email address: sacomm2019@gmail.com, using the correct abstract submission form. Submissions not submitted on the correct form will not be accepted. Incomplete submissions will not be accepted.

The Abstract Submission form can be downloaded here: Abstract Submission Form

Key dates:

Abstract: 30 April 2019

Notification of acceptance: 31 May 2019

Full paper submission: 5 August 2019