CALL FOR PAPERS: Mundu: A journal of Emerging African Communication

Open Call for Papers – Marginality


The women, and ultimately movement, that exposed top Hollywood producer, Harvey Weinstein, was named 2017 Time Magazine person of the year. This recognition is by no means a barometer of the progress that has been made in terms of gender equality. It is only an indication of “the evolution of human rights from a patriarchal, male centred world, in which women’s rights were not a consideration to now when women’s rights are integral to the world we live in” (Madeley, 2017).

In such instances of continued struggles for equality, the fight against marginality or conditions where individuals and cultures occupy a peripheral status to a “center”, has brought to the fore the problematic nature of social relations (Nabizadeh, 2016).

Media observers have noted that although most politicians and prominent figures often face the glare of news media, matters are slightly different for women. Feminist scholars write that the media scrutiny trained on women seeking higher positions, be it political or any other sphere, can be “contemptuous” (Ntuli, 2017). This is despite women constituting a powerful force in politics and all levels of government and society. A fact that has not changed much over the years, as evidenced by the United States 2016, and the 2017 ANC presidential campaigns; both criticized for bias against women candidates (Beaudoux, 2017; Ntuli, 2017).

Similarly, the 2015 and 2016 student strikes demanding to extrication of colonial legacies and fee free education in public institutions of higher learning, illustrated the continued marginalisation of previously disadvantaged groups.  The call for a decolonised academy and the plea to overhaul current social practice that perpetuate exclusionary colonial systems gained widespread support (Catherine Addora Hoppers 2012). Observers pointed out that the turbulence and disruption caused by the demand for redress, indicated the broader social need to democratize previously exclusive centers of power.

In light of the big strides that have been made by social groups fighting for equality, and the many other issues that are still to be addressed.

The Emerging Scholars and Media Studies Interest Group would like to invite interested parties to submit a paper for publication in the inaugural issue of Mundu: A journal of Emerging African Communication. The papers selected for publication will also be presented in a panel discussion at the 2018 SACOMM Conference in Johannesburg.

Selected themes:

  • Marginality, decolonisation, redress and media studies
  • Teaching, learning, research and engagement in decolonial contexts
  • What does a decolonised media studies pedagogy look like?
  • The role of alternative and critical media system
  • The relationship between marginality and the political economy of media
  • Social construct of marginal roles
  • Tensions between the media, marginality and privilege
  • Representation of marginality in the media (television, radio, print, online)


Submission Guidelines

Please send a one-page abstract to by March 30, 2018.

Notification of abstract selection will be sent by April 9. Selected authors will be required to convert the abstract into a journal article for publication by June 1.

Please note that submitted papers will go through a peer review process, and if successful, will be published in the inaugural issue of the Emerging Scholar journal, which is to be launched at the 2018 SACOMM Conference.

CONFERENCE: Keynote Speaker: Prof. Francis Nyamnjoh

The confirmed Keynote Speaker for SACOMM 2018, Johannesburg, is Prof. Francis Nyamnjoh of the University of Cape Town.

“About Francis Nyamnjoh

Francis B. Nyamnjoh joined the University of Cape Town in August 2009 as Professor of Social Anthropology from the Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa (CODESRIA), Dakar, Senegal, where he served as Head of Publications from July 2003 to July 2009. He has taught sociology, anthropology and communication studies at universities in Cameroon and Botswana, and has researched and written extensively on Cameroon and Botswana.

In October 2012 he received a University of Cape Town Excellence Award for “Exceptional Contribution as a Professor in the Faculty of Humanities”. He is the recipient of the “ASU African Hero 2013” annual award by the African Students Union, Ohio University, USA. He is: a B1 rated Professor and Researcher by the South African National Research Foundation (NRF); a Fellow of the Cameroon Academy of Science since August 2011; a fellow of the African Academy of Science since December 2014; a fellow of the Academy of Science of South Africa since 2016; and Chair of the Editorial Board of the South African Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) Press since January 2011.

His scholarly books include: Africa’s Media, Democracy and the Politics of Belonging (2005); Insiders and Outsiders: Citizenship and Xenophobia in Contemporary Southern Africa (2006); “C’est l’homme qui fait l’homme”: Cul-de-Sac Ubuntu-ism in Côte d’Ivoire (2015); and #RhodesMustFall: Nibbling at Resilient Colonialism in South Africa (2016).” –

CONFERENCE: Call for Papers

Submission Deadline of Abstracts: 30 April 2018

A crossroads is a site where roads intersect. It is a point of crisis, a turning point, and a point of alternative configurations, convergence plus divergence, meeting and departure, unity and disunity. Metaphorically, it is a point of flux and change, a critical juncture at which a life-changing decision must be made. The crossroads is a superposition of varied, multiple, different – sometimes conflicting – tendencies, impulses and trajectories, and there is little certainty about the future. At a crossroads movement is channelled, controlled, regulated, or freed: we can stand still or go forward, get lost or find endless possibilities, be trapped by inaction, insincerity and passivity or find freedom. At a crossroads, we can be transfixed to the past and its aftermaths, or we sincerely take the future on. We may be misled, be manipulated into going in particular directions, or we may use the crossroads to affirm our independence and agency, forge alliances, and build new, transformative, ethical, just futures.

To submit, or read the full Call for Papers, please visit the dedicated site for SACOMM 2018.