NEWS

CFP: The Asian Conference on Education 2019

“Independence & Interdependence”
The conference theme for The Asian Conference on Education 2019 (ACE2019) is “Independence & Interdependence”, and invites reflections on the desirability, extent and limits on independence and autonomy for ourselves, our students, and the institutions and structures within which we work, teach and learn. We do not educate, nor are we educated, in vacuums, but in such contexts and constraints as families, groups, and societies; of nations and cultures; of identities and religions; and of political and financial realities.The technological and logistical advances of globalisation have enabled us to become independent and empowered as never before, but have also made us more dependent on the very things allowing autonomy. While technologies allow us to communicate with those on the other side of the world, they can also separate us from those nearby, and contribute to alienation, or loneliness. And yet this increased interconnectedness offers great opportunities to work together to solve some of the world’s most pressing issues, and reminds us of our responsibilities towards each other. Our independence is contextualised in the relations we enjoy with others; in our families and communities, shared institutions, in our wider societies, geographical and political entities, and finally, as a part of the one world we all share.How do we help students and teachers alike navigate and curate the vast information available? How do we encourage individual growth while also underlining the importance of belonging and of the reciprocal responsibilities and privileges of education? How do we help students build the skills and attitudes necessary for positive engagement in distributed, globalised communities that so often lead to polarisation and alienation instead? How do we educate with independence and interdependence in mind? How do we engage meaningfully in “international development” through education? What are the successes and failures of the international system in addressing some of the most pressing concerns of our time?These and many other questions will be addressed at the conference, and we look forward to coming together to exchange ideas and explore new research paths together. We encourage scholars and practitioners working at the intersection of education and international development to explore and submit under the following conference themes:Diversity in Global ContextsEducation & Socio-Economic DevelopmentEducation & Development: Local & Global/Domestic & InternationalEducation: Public & Private PartnershipsEconomics & Management of EducationLiteracy: Poverty & SustainabilityInnovation & ValueIn conjunction with our Global Partners, we look forward to extending you a warm welcome in 2019.

– The ACE2019 Organising CommitteeTien-Hui Chiang, Zhengzhou University, China
Joseph Haldane, The International Academic Forum (IAFOR), Japan
Paul Lai, Nagoya University, Japan
Tzu-Bin Lin, National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan
Yvonne Masters, University of New England, Australia
José McClanahan, Creighton University, USA
Ted O’Neill, Gakushuin University, Japan
Justin Sanders, Osaka University, Japan
Zachary Walker, University College London (UCL), UK

Financial Support for PhD students and Early Career Academics

IAFOR is dedicated to helping young scholars achieve their research and academic goals, while also encouraging them to apply the principles of interdisciplinary study to their work. IAFOR offers travel and accommodation grants, and full or partial scholarships covering conference registration fees, to select PhD students and early career academics who might not otherwise have the financial resources to be able to attend our academic conferences.

For information about the financial support IAFOR offers to PhD students and early career academics, please visit our Grants & Scholarships page. If you know anyone who could benefit from IAFOR’s Grants & Scholarships Programme, please forward this URL: https://ace.iafor.org/grants-and-scholarships/. Abstracts must be submitted by June 21, 2019 in order to be considered for funding.

Location & Venue: Toshi Center Hotel, Tokyo, Japan
Conference Dates: Thursday, October 31, 2019 to Sunday, November 3, 2019
Conference Theme: Independence & Interdependence

Early Bird Abstract Submission Deadline: June 21, 2019*
Final Abstract Submission Deadline: August 22, 2019

Early Bird Registration Deadline: July 18, 2019*
Final Registration Deadline for presenters: September 19, 2019

This conference is organised by The International Academic Forum (IAFOR) in association with the IAFOR Research Centre at the Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP) in Osaka University, Japan.

Join the conversation with #IAFOR and #IAFORACE

*Submit early to take advantage of the discounted registration rates. 

Copyright Amendment Bill: Implications for universities

By Keyan Tomaselli  

As researchers we need to be aware of the potential impacts of the Bill on our daily work, performance management KPAs and research funding. Here are three just published interventions on the issue. The Bill will be tabled at NCOP later this month.

Fatally flawed copyright bill will favour internet giants

Concerns of authors have been ignored in the bid to expand so-called ‘education exceptions’ 14 MARCH 2019 – 05:10 SIHAWUKELE NGUBANE

https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/opinion/2019-03-14-fatally-flawed-copyright-bill-will-favour-internet-giants/

Copyright Amendment Bill is vital for SA to be part of 21st century

Copyright is a form of intellectual property that protects expressions of ideas and benefits those who provide a diversity of cultural resources that are valuable in society 13 MARCH 2019 – 05:10 CARLO SCOLLO LAVIZZARI

https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/opinion/2019-03-13-copyright-amendment-bill-is-vital-for-sa-to-be-part-of-21st-century/

Free to reproduce, free to exploit: South Africa’s copyright amendment bill    14 March, The Conversation, Keyan G Tomaselli

The general consensus of a recently organised symposium attended by copyright lawyers, law professors, university presses, journal editors, copyright officers and other interested parties is that the proposed bill will hammer one more nail into the coffin of South Africa’s ailing university system.

http://theconversation.com/free-to-reproduce-free-to-exploit-south-africas-copyright-amendment-bill-113212

This article was submitted by Keyan Tomaselli – read the original article at “The Conversation”

Lecture: Jonathan Haynes

AFDA invites SACOMM members the a lecture by the visiting Fulbright Senior Scholar, Jonathan Haynes.

His area of specialisation is Nollywood. He would like to engage with us on more up to date perspectives on Nollywood – as he is currently the Fulbright Senior Scholar, Departments of English and Creative Arts at the University of Lagos, Nigeria.

He has expressed the wish to not engage in a traditional class – but instead, to debate and discuss the issues that might arise from your experiences and ideas around Nollywood. An Academic Q&A round about Nollywood.

We look forward to welcome him and of course are interested in the debates. Please RSVP your attendance to Simone@afda.co.za – by Tuesday, 12.03.19.

Who: Jonathan Hayes – Visiting Senior Fulbright Scholar – https://jonhaynes.net

What: Contemporary Perspectives on Nollywood

When: Friday, 15 March 2019 – 09:00 –12:30

Where: AFDA JHB Campus – 41 Frost Avenue, 2092 Auckland Park

How: RSVP – Simone Singh, Course Administrative Assistant, Postgraduate Studies – simone@afda.co.za – by Tuesday, 12 March 2019.

CFP – SACOMM 2019: August 28-30, University of Cape Town

Inside | Outside

CALL FOR PAPERS

Current communication debates are increasingly dominated by polarities and conflicts. On closer inspection, these polarities are not always defined by antagonism or opposing ideologies, but are also informed by power imbalances in terms of race, class and gender, technological access, education, age, geospatial factors, and mobility.

This year’s theme looks at the positions of communications specialists, media producers and users as being inside or outside media systems; from being inside the echo chamber to being shut out by censorship; from speaking as an inside whistleblower to being left outside the frame. Who has and who controls access to creative technologies and distribution? Who speaks, who is being followed, who is being listened to and whose voices are being amplified? What is heard on air, or edited out? How does one’s position (either inside or outside) make one vulnerable, empowered, educated or misinformed?

Themes may include, but are not limited to the following:

Content platforms and gatekeepers

Film, media and marginality

Media networks and ecologies

Film and media censorship

Citizen journalism, community media and media corporations

Television beyond the box

Media scholarship and inclusion

African media scholarship in the world

Media platforms and questions of access

WhatsApp and citizen witnesses

News writing and news aggregation

Threats to media freedom

Social media

Corporate communication, crisis communication, strategic communication, organisational communication

Development communication

Election coverage

ABSTRACT CATEGORIES

There will be three categories of presentation:

Category 1: Full 20-minute conference paper presentations

Category 2: Panel discussion sessions and/or roundtable/workshop proposals

Category 3: Poster presentations

Best Paper Prizes

There are two paper prizes: a student award and an open paper prize. To be eligible for the awards, full papers must be submitted by 5th of August.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS

All abstracts must be submitted to the email address: sacomm2019@gmail.com, using the correct abstract submission form. Submissions not submitted on the correct form will not be accepted. Incomplete submissions will not be accepted. Submission of one abstract per person is encouraged to keep the programme manageable. No more than two abstracts per person (for different streams) will be allowed.

The Abstract Submission form can be downloaded here: Abstract Submission Form

Key dates:

Abstract: 30 April 2019

Notification of acceptance: 31 May 2019

Full paper submission: 5 August 2019

This year’s theme looks at the positions of media producers and users as being inside or outside media systems; from being inside the echo chamber to being shut out by censorship; from speaking as an inside whistleblower to being left outside the frame. Who has and who controls access to creative technologies and distribution? Who speaks, who is being followed, who is being listened to and whose voices are being amplified? What is heard on air, or edited out? How does one’s position (either inside or outside) make one vulnerable, empowered, educated or misinformed?

Themes may include, but are not limited to the following:

Content platforms and gatekeepers

Film, media and marginality

Media networks and ecologies

Film and media censorship

Citizen journalism, community media and media corporations

Television beyond the box

Media scholarship and inclusion

African media scholarship in the world

Media platforms and questions of access

WhatsApp and citizen witnesses

News writing and news aggregation

Threats to media freedom

Election coverage

ABSTRACT CATEGORIES

There will be three categories of presentation:

Category 1: Full 20-minute conference paper presentations

Category 2: Panel discussion sessions and/or roundtable/workshop proposals

Category 3: Poster presentations

Best Paper Prizes

There are two paper prizes: a student award and an open paper prize. To be eligible for the awards, full papers must be submitted by 5th of August.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS

All abstracts must be submitted to the email address: sacomm2019@gmail.com, using the correct abstract submission form. Submissions not submitted on the correct form will not be accepted. Incomplete submissions will not be accepted.

The Abstract Submission form can be downloaded here: Abstract Submission Form

Key dates:

Abstract: 30 April 2019

Notification of acceptance: 31 May 2019

Full paper submission: 5 August 2019

Announcing a CMRC Conference in Collaboration with SIMAGINE

Imagined Borders, Epistemic Freedoms: The Challenge of Social Imaginaries in Media, Art, Religion and Decoloniality
Hosted by The Center for Media, Religion, and Culture

University of Colorado Boulder

January 8-11, 2020

 The question of borders and the practice of bordering persist in a world destined for encounters and confrontations. This persistence today bears resemblance to long-standing legacies of coloniality, modernity, and globalization, but it also foregrounds new narratives, aesthetics, and politics of exclusion and dehumanization. Talk of walls, fortresses, boundaries, and deportation has never been a political or philosophical anomaly, but rather a reflection of a particularistic social imaginary, a linear compulsion of epistemic assumptions that sees the world through the logic of hierarchy, classification, difference, and ontological supremacy. This foreclosure is a widely shared and accepted social imaginary, as demonstrated in current scholarship in the critical humanities and social and political sciences: a foreclosure that has also defined institutions and disciplines of knowledge production which continue to marginalize other knowledge systems and intellectual traditions and refuse to acknowledge their viability and legitimacy in the academy. Disciplinary walls and intellectually demarcated canons within the Western and Westernized university in the Global North and South have generally produced narrow curricula and models of learning that reproduce selective systems of thought, discourses and practices. 

The tenacity of this normalized worldview requires urgent new imaginaries: a decolonial perspective not only to call out the ontological instability of Western theory, but also to establish a sense of epistemic hospitality capable of liberating and re-centering other ways of knowing and dwelling in the world. This contestation of physical and cognitive borders has found its most ardent proponents in recent movements such as #RhodesMustFall, Standing Rock, Idle No More, Undocumented and Unafraid, #Whyismycurriculumsowhite, Arab Uprisings, Black Lives Matter, and #MeToo, among others. At the heart of this decolonial injunction is a desire by absented voices to reclaim the right to self-narrate, to signify, and to render visible local histories, other temporalities, subjectivities, cosmologies, and struggles silenced by Western and Westernized accounts of the world. 

The fields of art, religion and the media have not yet come under historical scrutiny about their own epistemic and existential imaginaries and whether they reify or disrupt dominant structures and legacies of knowledge production? Drawing from a variety of intellectual traditions and established academic disciplines, these fields risk carrying the same blind spots, the same foreclosures, the same ontological foundations, and the same centered claims to universality. 

What can a decolonial critique then do to avoid a zero-sum epistemology? And how can we develop new decolonial imaginaries as an invitation to undo the Eurocentrism of our paradigms, challenge the verticality of our pedagogical designs, and achieve an ethics of interpretation, an epistemic justice whereby theories from the South or from ‘the margins’ in the North are not treated merely as local or subjective? The decolonial attitude challenges us to avoid embracing singular universalities, and rethink altogether the hierarchies of global-local and of universal-particular that underlie this world’s inequality.

This will be the ninth in a series of successful international conferences held by the Center for Media, Religion, and Culture in Boulder. The previous meetings have brought together an interdisciplinary community of scholars for focused conversations on emerging issues in media and religion. Each has proven to be an important landmark in the development of theory and method in its respective area and has resulted in important collaborations, publications, and resources for further research and dialogue.

The 2020 conference is organized in conjunction with SIMAGINE, an international and interdisciplinary research consortium bringing together partners from the USA, the UK, Europe and South-Africa; it is hosted by the University of Humanistic Studies in Utrecht, the Netherlands, and dedicated to the study of social imaginaries between secularity and religion in a globalizing world. SIMAGINE has organized conferences on ‘Religion, Community, Borders’ leading to a special issue of the open access Journal for Religion and Transformation in December 2019. In 2018 the consortium published the volume Social Imaginaries in a Globalizing World.

The conference will feature keynote lectures and keynote conversations, as well as thematic panels and artistic performances. We invite papers and panels from across disciplines, intellectual traditions, and geographic locations that engage with these questions and beyond. Possible topics could include but are not limited to:

• Borders, Bordering, Border Zones between the Imaginary and the Real

• Modernity, Secularity, Religious Legacies and Universality

• Social Imaginaries and (the Critique of) Anthropocentrism

• Coloniality and Decolonial Epistemologies

• What Counts as Critical Theory and Decolonial Critique?

• What Counts as Religion in the Decolonial Imaginary?

• Big Data, Algorithmic Culture, and (De)Coloniality

• Decolonial Intersectionalities

• Decolonial Feminisms

• Decolonizing Race, Ethnicity, and Identity

• Decolonial Pedagogy, Methodology, and Praxis.

• Media, Religion, and Theoretical Provincialism

• Media, Arts, and Decolonial Theory

• Media, Religion, the Other, and the Subaltern

• Religion, Theology, and Social Imaginaries

• Social Imaginaries and (the Critique) of Neoliberalist Globalization

• Geopolitics of Knowledge Production

• Language, Publishing, and Boundaries of Learning

• Imagination and Worldview Education: Interreligious Dialogue

• Queering the Archives

 Abstracts of 300-350 words should be submitted to cmrc@colorado.edu by June 10, 2019. Please include your email address and university affiliation in your submission. 

For questions, email Nabil Echchaibi, Associate Director: nabil.echchaibi@colorado.edu.

or Stewart M. Hoover, Director: hoover@colorado.edu.

For more information, visit cmrc.colorado.edu

Call for Book Chapters: Television in the Digital Age: Disjuncture, Continuities and Prospects

Editors: Prof Gilbert Motsaathebe and Prof Sarah Chiumbu 

University of Johannesburg

Introduction 

The television industry has evolved drastically over the past few years. However, at the present moment the medium of television appears to be experiencing a continual cataclysm precipitated by the onslaught of multiple media platforms and digitization of content. All these developments are taking place in a policy environment. In this new media eco-system, the availability of content on internet platforms, the rise of on-demand content, streaming and pay per view services continue to transform viewing habits of television audience, forcing many television stations into an adapt-or-perish mode. The other factor is that the younger generation of today are very different from the generation of the time when television was a household medium which dominated leisure time activities. In this scenario television worldwide has seen a marked increase in the fragmentation of its audience and what some classify as the shrinkage of television audience. This has complicated the television business with regard to content generation, programming and scheduling, as television stations have to find innovative ways to adapt to this changing environment in which the power has shifted to the audience who are very much in control of what they watch. 

While some have expressed concern regarding the future of television others believe it will simply adapt and will continue to gain momentum and flourish again. What is clear, however, is that television as we know it will no longer be the same. As such, this edited anthology seeks to focus on embryonic issues in the study of television focusing on television in its current form, challenges and future trends, particularly with respect to countries in the Global South. We therefore invite chapters from scholars, researchers and television practitioners that interrogate the issues raised above. This book is not intended to be a be-it-all book in television but it hopes to address wide-ranging issues that students of television, practitioners and academics would find very relevant particularly in Africa and the Global South. We want to balance a range of factors to ensure that the anthology provides the best possible range of materials for modern day television scholars, students, practitioners and enthusiasts. We particularly welcome chapters that make a strong case for advancing theoretical or methodological understanding of television studies in its current form with strong focus on Africa and the Global South. 

The book is intended to serve as a key reference text in television studies. Although there are some articles and sporadic book chapters touching on some of the issues raised here, there is no elaborate work that focuses on most of the issues that this book seeks to cover particularly in the context of the Global South. 

The editors invite academics, researchers and practitioners to submit original chapters which are related, but not limited, to the following themes/aspects: 

* Television and multimedia platforms 

* Television and Digital Migration 

* Television Journalism in the Digital Age 

* Digitization and Television News 

* Television and Popular Culture 

* Community Television 

* Telvision and Streaming Services 

* Television and Social Media 

* Second Screen Viewing 

* Telvision and Audience Fragmentation 

* Television Newsroom and Editorial Independence 

* Television, Policy and Regulation in the Digital Age 

Submission Guidelines & Deadline: 

* Please submit chapter proposals/abstracts of 800 to 1000 words, clearly explaining the aims concerns of the proposed chapter. 

* A minimum of five (5) keywords must be provided 

* Chapter proposals should reach the editors before March 15, 2019 

* Authors will be notified of the outcome of their proposals on April 15, 2019 

* Full chapters which will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis are to be submitted by October 30, 2019. 

Important Dates 

Proposal Submission Deadline : 15 March 2019 Proposal Outcome : 15 April 2019 Full Chapter Submission : 30 October 2019 Review Process : November 2019 – March 2020 Revised Chapter from Authors : May 2020 Submission of Final Manuscript to the publisher: : July 2020 

Send chapter proposals to: Gilbert Motsaathebe – motsaathebeg@uj.ac.za Sarah Chiumbu – sarahc@uj.ac.za

ICA Washington DC

ICA Africa


  1. As you are probably aware, the 69th ICA Annual Conference will take place in Washington DC, from 24 – 28 May 2019 (both dates inclusive). The venue address is:-
 
Washington Hilton Hotel
1919 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington, District of Columbia  20009
United States
  1. Please note that Online registration is available until: 5/3/2019. Ensure that at registration you do so under tier C
  2. But before registration, kindly Renew or Join ICA to take advantage of member discounts on conference rates. The ICA membership year runs from 1 October to 30 September annually
  3. Early registration begins on 16 January 2019 and will close at 16:00 UTC on 17 April 2019.
  4. If you have questions related to conference registration please contact Kristine Rosa at membership@icahdq.org
  5. For more info on ICA#19 Washington DC, please visit the ICA website:https://www.icahdq.org/
  6. If you haven’t, please apply for the partial travel grant. Deadline is 1st March 2019:
  7. If you are traveling to DC for the Conference, please inform ICAfrica Secretary; Miriam (miriam.kwena@gmail.com ) for other logistical info.

Once again, thanks very much for choosing to be apart of ICA and ICAfrica.

ARTS AND CULTURE TO HOST THE 2019 SOUTH AFRICAN FILM SUMMIT, JOHANNESBURG

 MEDIA STATEMENT

Government through National Department of Arts and Culture will host the South African Film Summit from 04 – 05 February 2019 at Skyrink Studios, in Johannesburg Gauteng. The Summit will be held under the theme: “Transformation and innovation in the South African Film/Audio-Visual Industry and the 4th Industrial Revolution. Are we geared for change?”


Industry experts and policy makers within the audio-visual industry will deliberate on key resolutions as guiding efforts towards the development of the local film industry in alignment with emerging trends and global developments.

The South African Film Summit seeks to:

  • Assess the extent to which the current or emerging legislation and policies either enhance or hinder the transformation and development of the film and television industry in South Africa.
  • Evaluate the extent to which the South African Film Industry is catching up or aligning itself with emerging trends and global developments, premised by Pan-Africanism.
  • Create a platform for knowledge sharing through case studies and benchmarking with similar countries in the developing world.
  • Evaluating the successes and challenges of national and regional film industries with particular reference to funding and resources of the sector.

The South African Film Industry refers to the broader audio-visual media industry which includes film, television and digital media as defined in the Revised White Paper, 2017. The film industry is one of the oldest in the world having initiated in 1896. Despite such a long history, the South African film industry’s place within the local economy and globally is a contested one. This is in terms of its contribution in both social and economic value. 

As such, whether the industry is in its infancy or not remains a contentious matter. This is considering the low film production volumes, unsustainable business models and a largely freelance workforce because South Africa is not short on policies and strategies to support the industry.

“Policy coordination and coherence is important to ensure there are no unnecessary bottlenecks, contradictions and gaps that will negatively impact on the business environment while simultaneously encouraging investment, particularly from the private sector”, states Minister Nathi Mthethwa.

About 300 experts and policy makers from key organizations, Government and industry institutions such as: the South African Broadcasting Corporation National Film and Video Foundation; South African Screen Federation; South African Guild of Actors, South African Arts & Culture Youth Forum and Independent Black Filmmakers Collective as well as other local and international key stakeholders will take part in the summit.

“Addressing South Africa’s positioning in the film sector, not only in the continent but also globally, is an important one if the country is to compete in the creative economy”, concludes the Minister.

Media enquiries: Petunia Lessing

Cell: 066 301 4645 / email: petunial@dac.gov.za

For more information, please contact Asanda Magaqa: Cell: 072 327 6807 / email: asandam@dac.gov.za or Zimasa Velaphi, Cell: 072 172 8925 / email: zimasav@dac.gov.za

Issued by GCIS on behalf of the Department of Arts and Culture

24 January 2019 

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