The Lesser Violence Reading Group

Join us this Wednesday (21 October, 2020) at 13:00 (GMT+2) for the 3rd session of this year’s Lesser Violence Reading Group. 

VIAD & GALA are honoured to welcome Dee Marco and Kathleen Eberson as our facilitators for the session! As co-hosts of the Mamas with Attitude podcast, Dee and Kathleen will be speaking to feminist parenting and radical and everyday practices of care.    

  “Dee Marco and Kathleen Ebersohn come at the project of mothering with mutual curiosity, but with different modalities and approaches. This is celebrated in their podcast, Mamas with Attitude (MWA) where there are many intersecting elements, themes and positions, yet they muse about mothering and the project of mothering in its multitude of capacities, differently”   

  Kathleen is currently interested in the ways in which motherhood can be experienced as a trauma or a wound, especially in matrescence, the transition in becoming a mother, and whether stories can be used as a balm for trauma. Dee’s interest in the broad topic of motherhood centers on motherhood as performance and as action. This action, best described as motherhood as verb and action, takes on various forms of radical and everyday care seen in experiences and practices.
PLAYLIST: Click here to access the playlist of media and readings Dee and Kathleen have assigned for the session. Please remember to engage with the playlist before attending the live chat session.  

REGISTRATION: please note that in keeping with the group’s intention to create enabling and caring discursive spaces, the online chat room will be limited to 25 people or fewer. Please click on the button below to register. ! Register Here 

CFP: African Journalism Studies @40

Invitation for submissions for a Special Issue

Special Issue Title: AJS at 40. Towards an agenda for African journalism and media research in changing communication ecologies

African Journalism Studies(AJS)—formerly Equid Novi— was launched in 1980 as an intervention to provide space for research on the then fairly nascent field of journalism and media studies within South Africa. Over the years, and with South Africa’s reintegration into the African and global political economy post-1994, the journal grew to become one of the leading spaces for research within the media studies discipline, increasingly attracting voices from across the African continent (including the MENA region). As it celebrates its four decades in existence, the journal continues to strive to become the preeminent intellectual platform for both emerging and established researchers from Africa, and also to engage in comparative research and conversations between the Global South and the Global North.

The special issue will feature full research articles as well as shorter critical essays and reflections. We invite submissions of full research articleson any of the following topics:

The history of journalism and media research in South Africa and on the African Continent
African epistemological frameworks for understanding African media and its role in changing societies
The shifting digital media ecologies and implications for journalism and media research in Africa
The political economy of African journalism and media
Towards a sociology of African journalism in a changing media milieu.
Decolonizing African journalism and media research
The future of journalism education in Africa
An agenda for journalism and media research in Africa
Researching Journalism and Media in Africa: Reflections on Methodologies
Researching African language news and politics in Africa
African journalism in the era of surveillance
Beyond ‘voices from the suburbs’: How African journalism can serve society better
African journalism and struggles for democratization

All articles submitted should be original work and must not be under consideration by other publications. Full articles should be submitted via the Journal’s electronic submission platform, and must adhere to the AJS submission guidelines

The word account should be between 6000-8000 words. Please make your submission under the category of “Special Issue”.

Deadline for Full Paper submissions:15th January 2021.

All queries regarding submissions should be emailed to Prof Wallace Chuma (Wallace.chuma@uct.ac.za)

ToC: Critical Arts, 34,(2) (2020) – Special Issue: Rethinking Chinese Questions in Western Literary Theories

Critical Arts, Volume 34, Issue 2 (2020) – Special Issue: Brand China, Guest Editor: Jun Zeng

Introduction 

Rethinking Chinese Questions in Western Literary Theories

Jun Zeng 

Articles 

Thinking on the Research Methods of Dialogism in Chinese and Western Literary Theories

Jun Zeng 

A Critical Response to Western Critics’ Controversial Viewpoints on Chinese Traditional Narrative and Fiction Criticism

Guoqiang Qiao 

Globalization, Divergence and Cultural Fecundity: Seeking Harmony in Diversity through François Jullien’s Transcultural Reflection on China

You Wu 

Reception and Dissemination of Qiyun Shengdong in the Western Art Criticism

Xia Wang 

Remapping Taipei for Jameson? Rediscovering the Indigenization, Modernity, and Postmodernity of Taipei

Yuyu Wu 

The Insight and Limitation of “Post-Theory”: The Poetics Problem of Chinese Cinema Carried by David Bordwell

Chen Yu 

The Renewal of Western Philosophy: On Heidegger’s Expropriation of Lao Tzu’s Thought Through Xiao Shiyi

Haitian Zhou 

Yixiang (意象) in Contemporary Chinese Ink Installation Art

Siying Duan 

“They’ve made our blood ties black”: On the Burst of Online Racism Towards the African in China’s Social Media

Tingting Liu Zhuoyun Deng 

Book review 

Art, trade, and cultural mediation in Asia, 1600–1950

by Raquel A. G. Reyes, London, Palgrave Macmillan, 2019, xv + 131 pp., $61.75 (hardback) ISBN 978-1-13757-236-3

Jianwei Zheng Wenjun Fan 

About Critical Arts

From its inception, Critical Arts  examined the relationship between texts and contexts, cultural formations and popular forms of expression, mainly in the Third World, but after the 1994 transition in South Africa  Critical Arts repositioned itself in the South-North  and  East-West nexus focusing on developing transdisciplinary epistemologies. Critical Arts ‘ authors are Africans debating Africa with the rest; and the rest debating Africa and the South and with each other.

Editor-in-Chief

Keyan G Tomaselli

keyant@uj.ac.za

Editorial coordinator

David Nothling

criticalarts@ukzn.ac.za

Article submission:

https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/rcrc

STATEMENT ON PROF GLENDA GRAY AND HER RIGHT TO ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND EXPRESSION OF DIFFERENCE

The underwriting Executive Committee members of the South African Communications Association (Sacomm) records in this statement support for academic freedom and freedom of expression as a constitutional right in the wake of the controversy surrounding a government proposal to investigate Professor Glenda Gray for expressing a different view.

President of the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC) and a member of the Ministerial Advisory Council (MAC), Gray expressed reservations about the effectivity of the current lockdown. Gray was appointed by the Minister of Health to advise on matters relating to the management of the Covid-19 pandemic.

In May 2020, Gray participated in media interviews and together with other eminent scientists expressed criticism on the implementation of some aspects of the lockdown regulations announced by government. The Health Minister Dr Zweli Mkize responded to each of Gray’s criticisms in a step by step, point by point, refutation.

It is correct and within his right to defend the government’s decisions and stances, as it is within all scientists rights to differ in approaches, methods, and of course ideological stances. It is what is taking place globally. This transparency of debate is important for our democracy; indeed it is what makes our democracy a vibrant space.

However, Acting Director General of the Department of Health, Dr Anban Pillay went much further. He has asked for an investigation into the conduct of its president, Gray, because she held different views – stating that the SAMRC – is a government entity.

Actually the SAMRC is meant to be an independent statutory body. According to Assaf: “Dr Pillay’s actions represent a violation of the right to academic freedom that includes the right to freedom of academic research (s.16 (d) of the Constitution).”

Assaf: “we believe that freedom of scientific enquiry is fundamental to the health of our constitutional democracy. Academics and researchers need the space to undertake independent research in an environment that is free from fear, intimidation and political interference. To threaten researchers and to muzzle their voice would have a chilling effect on creativity, innovation and experimentation.

“We believe that the spirit of science was beautifully captured in President Ramaphosa’s address to the nation on 24 May 2020 when he said that “We appreciate the diverse and sometimes challenging views of the scientists and health professionals in our country, which stimulate public debate and enrich our response.”

It is this spirit that should inform the public response to science and scientists as they do their vital work.

We support this view of the president as well as that of Assaf. We point out that any idea to “investigate” anyone for having different views smacks of Stalinism, authoritarianism, and is in distinct contradiction with our constitutional democracy. Such threats must be withdrawn with urgency.

Sacomm Executive Committee:

President – Prof Elnerine (WJ) Greeff

Deputy President – Prof Tanja Bosch

Interest group Convenors / Co-convenors:
Communications Advocacy and Activism – Prof Glenda Daniels
Corporate Communication – Prof Mehita Iqani
Communication Studies – Dr Sandra Pitcher
Emerging Scholars Network: Ms Sylvia Skhosana and Mr Collen Chambwera

CFP: CALL FOR ABSTRACTS FOR AN EDITED VOLUME


INDIGENOUS AFRICAN POPULAR MUSIC: THE ART AND ITS APPLICATIONS

Abiodun Salawu andIsrael Fadipe

Indigenous popular music is an essential feature of any African society, which is being used for every endeavour an African engages in: celebration of life and death, daily activities, economics, politics, religions. Thus, music is a way of life. All over Africa, there are also various genres of indigenous music which have been used to document African histories, democratic experience, social crusade, mobilisation for food security, health, environmental health, gender empowerment, literacy and other developmental issues that have had great impact on the lives of Africans. Africans’ reality revolves around their pre-colonial, colonial and post-colonial experiences as these are part of what constitute African identity in the globalised world. Unlike the conventional media (book, newspaper, magazine, radio and television) which evidently have been used to document African histories, indigenous African media, especially indigenous African popular music and its artistes have not attracted sufficient attention to determine how they have documented much of African experiences and events. At this juncture in Africa’s history, it is pertinent to examine the role being played by indigenous African popular music and African popular music artistes. It is important to know the role our African popular music artistes have played and are playing in documenting or intervening in these African experiences. What are their contributions to the reportage, awareness and mitigation of these realities that have been experienced by African societies in the past and present? How have the indigenous African popular music artistes portrayed the world, Africa, governments, people and themselves in relation to these realities? What are the dominant themes or narratives or issues about, for instance, African democratic experience, gender empowerment, food security, environmental health in African indigenous popular music? How do the Africans perceive the narratives about these realities in the indigenous African popular music? How have the indigenous African popular music narratives influenced Africans’ knowledge, attitude and practice of the developmental issues in their respective societies? How does the indigenous African popular music represent African cosmology? What is indigenous African popular music? Who are the indigenous African popular music artistes? In what ways do the indigenous African popular musicians serve as philosophers and prophets to their societies?

This book will try to fill the apparent gaps in the field of  indigenous African popular music and social change. This is the reason why original works by authors interested in this project will be encouraged to focus on any genre of indigenous African popular music and artistes. Among the subjects for consideration as chapters are the following indicative topics:

The Nature, Philosophies and Genres of African Indigenous Popular Music

Indigenous African Popular Music and Health Communication

Indigenous African Popular Music, Democracy and Politics

Indigenous African Popular Music and Social Crusade

Indigenous African Popular Music and Security Issues (Food Security etc.)

Indigenous African Popular Music and Environmental Health

Indigenous African Popular Music and Gender Empowerment

Indigenous African Popular Music and African Children

Indigenous African Popular Music and African Youths

Indigenous African Popular Music and other development issues

Indigenous African Popular Music, Religions and Religious Activities

Indigenous African Popular Music and African Philosophy of Unborn, Life and Death

Indigenous African Popular Music and African Indigenous Cultures

Indigenous African Popular Music and African Science

Indigenous African Popular Music and the World

The Future of the Indigenous African Popular Music

Indigenous African Popular Music Economics

Indigenous African Popular Music Artistes

Indigenous Popular Music Artistes as Philosophers

Indigenous African Popular Music as Prophets

Indigenous African Popular Music Artistes as Social Critics/Crusaders

Indigenous African Popular Music Audience

Indigenous African Popular Music in the Broadcast Media

Indigenous African Popular Music on YouTube etc.

Influence of the indigenous African music on the African modern music

The list is by no means exhaustive

Oxford University Press has expressed interest in publishing the book.

Interested persons should please submit abstracts of 300 – 500 words to israelfadipe77@gmail.com by June 20, 2020. Decisions on abstracts received will be communicated by June 27, 2020. Full papers of accepted abstracts will be expected by September 30, 2020.

Professor Abiodun Salawu
Director of Research Entity: Indigenous Language Media in Africa
Faculty of Humanities

North-West University
Mafikeng Campus
Private Bag X2046
Mmabatho 2735
South Africa

Telephone: +27 18 389 2238

E-mail: abiodun.salawu@nwu.ac.za
            salawuabiodun@gmail.com
           salawuabiodun@yahoo.com

Lecture: Jonathan Haynes

AFDA invites SACOMM members the a lecture by the visiting Fulbright Senior Scholar, Jonathan Haynes.

His area of specialisation is Nollywood. He would like to engage with us on more up to date perspectives on Nollywood – as he is currently the Fulbright Senior Scholar, Departments of English and Creative Arts at the University of Lagos, Nigeria.

He has expressed the wish to not engage in a traditional class – but instead, to debate and discuss the issues that might arise from your experiences and ideas around Nollywood. An Academic Q&A round about Nollywood.

We look forward to welcome him and of course are interested in the debates. Please RSVP your attendance to Simone@afda.co.za – by Tuesday, 12.03.19.

Who: Jonathan Hayes – Visiting Senior Fulbright Scholar – https://jonhaynes.net

What: Contemporary Perspectives on Nollywood

When: Friday, 15 March 2019 – 09:00 –12:30

Where: AFDA JHB Campus – 41 Frost Avenue, 2092 Auckland Park

How: RSVP – Simone Singh, Course Administrative Assistant, Postgraduate Studies – simone@afda.co.za – by Tuesday, 12 March 2019.

CFP – SACOMM 2019: August 28-30, University of Cape Town

Inside | Outside

CALL FOR PAPERS

Current communication debates are increasingly dominated by polarities and conflicts. On closer inspection, these polarities are not always defined by antagonism or opposing ideologies, but are also informed by power imbalances in terms of race, class and gender, technological access, education, age, geospatial factors, and mobility.

This year’s theme looks at the positions of communications specialists, media producers and users as being inside or outside media systems; from being inside the echo chamber to being shut out by censorship; from speaking as an inside whistleblower to being left outside the frame. Who has and who controls access to creative technologies and distribution? Who speaks, who is being followed, who is being listened to and whose voices are being amplified? What is heard on air, or edited out? How does one’s position (either inside or outside) make one vulnerable, empowered, educated or misinformed?

Themes may include, but are not limited to the following:

Content platforms and gatekeepers

Film, media and marginality

Media networks and ecologies

Film and media censorship

Citizen journalism, community media and media corporations

Television beyond the box

Media scholarship and inclusion

African media scholarship in the world

Media platforms and questions of access

WhatsApp and citizen witnesses

News writing and news aggregation

Threats to media freedom

Social media

Corporate communication, crisis communication, strategic communication, organisational communication

Development communication

Election coverage

ABSTRACT CATEGORIES

There will be three categories of presentation:

Category 1: Full 20-minute conference paper presentations

Category 2: Panel discussion sessions and/or roundtable/workshop proposals

Category 3: Poster presentations

Best Paper Prizes

There are two paper prizes: a student award and an open paper prize. To be eligible for the awards, full papers must be submitted by 5th of August.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS

All abstracts must be submitted to the email address: sacomm2019@gmail.com, using the correct abstract submission form. Submissions not submitted on the correct form will not be accepted. Incomplete submissions will not be accepted. Submission of one abstract per person is encouraged to keep the programme manageable. No more than two abstracts per person (for different streams) will be allowed.

The Abstract Submission form can be downloaded here: Abstract Submission Form

Key dates:

Abstract: 30 April 2019

Notification of acceptance: 31 May 2019

Full paper submission: 5 August 2019

This year’s theme looks at the positions of media producers and users as being inside or outside media systems; from being inside the echo chamber to being shut out by censorship; from speaking as an inside whistleblower to being left outside the frame. Who has and who controls access to creative technologies and distribution? Who speaks, who is being followed, who is being listened to and whose voices are being amplified? What is heard on air, or edited out? How does one’s position (either inside or outside) make one vulnerable, empowered, educated or misinformed?

Themes may include, but are not limited to the following:

Content platforms and gatekeepers

Film, media and marginality

Media networks and ecologies

Film and media censorship

Citizen journalism, community media and media corporations

Television beyond the box

Media scholarship and inclusion

African media scholarship in the world

Media platforms and questions of access

WhatsApp and citizen witnesses

News writing and news aggregation

Threats to media freedom

Election coverage

ABSTRACT CATEGORIES

There will be three categories of presentation:

Category 1: Full 20-minute conference paper presentations

Category 2: Panel discussion sessions and/or roundtable/workshop proposals

Category 3: Poster presentations

Best Paper Prizes

There are two paper prizes: a student award and an open paper prize. To be eligible for the awards, full papers must be submitted by 5th of August.

ABSTRACT SUBMISSIONS

All abstracts must be submitted to the email address: sacomm2019@gmail.com, using the correct abstract submission form. Submissions not submitted on the correct form will not be accepted. Incomplete submissions will not be accepted.

The Abstract Submission form can be downloaded here: Abstract Submission Form

Key dates:

Abstract: 30 April 2019

Notification of acceptance: 31 May 2019

Full paper submission: 5 August 2019

CONFERENCE: Call for Papers

The Theme for SACOMM 2018: COMMUNICATION AT A CROSSROADS
Submission Deadline of Abstracts: 30 April 2018

A crossroads is a site where roads intersect. It is a point of crisis, a turning point, and a point of alternative configurations, convergence plus divergence, meeting and departure, unity and disunity. Metaphorically, it is a point of flux and change, a critical juncture at which a life-changing decision must be made. The crossroads is a superposition of varied, multiple, different – sometimes conflicting – tendencies, impulses and trajectories, and there is little certainty about the future. At a crossroads movement is channelled, controlled, regulated, or freed: we can stand still or go forward, get lost or find endless possibilities, be trapped by inaction, insincerity and passivity or find freedom. At a crossroads, we can be transfixed to the past and its aftermaths, or we sincerely take the future on. We may be misled, be manipulated into going in particular directions, or we may use the crossroads to affirm our independence and agency, forge alliances, and build new, transformative, ethical, just futures.

To submit, or read the full Call for Papers, please visit the dedicated site for SACOMM 2018.

SACOMM Listserv

For many years, Prof. Keyan Tomaselli managed the SACOMM Listserv with utmost dedication and consideration. In 2017, Dr. Elnerine Greeff (UNISA) kindly agreed to take over this responsibility.

Join our Listserv by contacting Dr. Elnerine (WJ) Greeff greefwj@unisa.ac.za
We will not share your information with third parties. We communicate Calls for Papers and activities by the various Interest Groups periodically.

SACOMM STATEMENT: Student protests and related Freedom of Expression rights

21 October 2015

SACOMM is the professional representative association which represents academics and scholars in South Africa, working within the fields of the communication sciences, including media studies, journalism, film, corporate communication and communication in general.

We note with concern the various instances of violation of freedom of expression and speech rights, accompanying the current student protests against the rise of university tuition fees.

Nationwide, our students and academics have legitimate concerns over the rising cost of tuition fees, which serve as a mechanism for economic exclusion from higher education. The students and others protesting peacefully in solidarity, are within their constitutionally protected rights to express these concerns through protest action, assembly, organising and mobilising, and via media communications channels such as the social media.

The efforts at various sites around the country to deny student groups from practising these rights are deplorable, since they violate the principles of an open democracy, the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, and the fundamental human rights of free expression, speech and the right of assembly and/or protest. Such recent transgressions of these rights include:

  • The Western Cape High Court interdict regarding student protests at the University of Cape Town, including the apparent interdiction of the hashtag “#FEESMUSTFALL”, which amounts to the banning of a free speech act that is unconstitutional and therefore unlawful.
  • The reported shutting down of the Wifi service at the University of Pretoria, which disenables students from making use of communications networks during the protests, including the social media.
  • The shutting down of the University of Pretoria campus by security, thus preventing students from partaking in their right to assembly on the campus.
  • The presence of an armed police contingent at recent protests near the Wits campus – a clear threat to the safety of students while practicing their free expression rights of protest and assembly.
  • The arrest and detention of students at the University of Cape Town.
  • The use of stun grenades and rubber bullets by the police against protesting students at Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, causing injury to some students.
  • The various instances of police violence against protesting students at the Tshwane University of Technology (which has been recurrent for some time).
  • The use of violence and stun grenades by public order policing against students outside of Parliament in Cape Town.

We call on all university managers to show respect for our scholars and we call on scholars to respect the rule of law, and with university managers to foster open channels for constructive engagement. We ask that you remind yourselves that the students are entitled, by law, to utilise all modes of communications, including the social media, to organise, debate, connect, and disseminate their messages. But we also deplore the use of intimidation, threat and violence by any party.

We call on the South African Police Service and all campus security workers to practice restraint and ensure the safety of our young people, while allowing them to practice their right to have their voices heard through the actions of protest and assembly.  By the same logic, we must respect the rights of those who wish to continue with their rights of association and freedom of assembly on campuses.

We offer solidarity to our academic colleagues at various campuses around the country, who have shown support to the students, and attempted to act as mediators between security workers and police in order to ensure the safety of the student protestors.

SACOMM stands in support of the struggle of students to make quality higher education a more accessible reality for all scholars willing to learn. No one should be made poor from attending a university.

 

For further comment contact:

Prof Colin Chasi (SACOMM President): 082 555 0436

Prof Pier Paolo Frassinelli (SACOMM Communication Advocacy focus group): 072 338 0406